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Business LibreTexts

Chapters

  • Page ID
    32622
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    • Contributed by Richard T. Watson, Pierre Berthon, Leyland F. Pitt, & George M. Zinkhan

    • 1: An Introduction
      Chapter One introduces the key themes covered in this book.
    • 2: Electronic commerce technology
      Chapter Two deals with the technology that underlies electronic commerce. Specifically, we discuss the methods that computers use to communicate with each other. We compare and contrast: the Internet (which is global in nature and has the potential to communicate with multiple stakeholder groups); the intranet (which focuses on internal communications within the organization–such as communication with employees); the extranet (which concentrates on exchanges with a specific business partner).
    • 3: Attracting and retaining visitors
      This chapter introduces elements of electronic strategy. In particular, we describe business practices that evolve because of the way that the Web changes the nature of communication between firms and customers. We describe attractors , which firms use to draw visitors to their Web site, including sponsorship, the customer service center, and the town hall.
    • 4: Promotion - Integrated Web communications
      This is the first of a series of five chapters that discuss the four major functions of marketing: promotion, price, distribution, and product (service). As the Web is a new communications medium, we devote two chapters to promotion. In Chapter Four, we introduce a model for thinking about communication strategy in cyberspace: the Integrated Internet Marketing model.
    • 5: Promotion and purchase - Measuring effectiveness
      Chapter Five describes new methods for measuring communication effectiveness in cyberspace. Specifically, we discuss the Internet as a new medium, in contrast to broadcasting and publishing. Currently, Web users perceive this medium to be similar to a magazine, perhaps because 85 percent of Web content is text. Other capabilities of the Web (e.g., sound) are not extensively used at this point.
    • 6: Distribution
      Organizations needed to be large to respond to these logistical challenges. The advent of electronic commerce has the potential to transform logistics and distribution. Today, a small software firm in Austin, Texas, can deliver its product (via the Web) to a customer in Seoul, South Korea. The economic landscape is altered dramatically. This chapter (along with the others) is future oriented as we outline strategic directions that are likely to be successful in the twenty-first century.
    • 7: Service
      Services are more and more important in the U.S. economy. In Chapter Seven, we describe how electronic commerce comes to blur the distinction between products and services. Traditionally, services are a challenge to market because of four key properties: intangibility, simultaneity, heterogeneity, and perishability. In this chapter, we show how electronic commerce can be used to overcome traditional problems in services marketing.
    • 8: Pricing
      Price directly affects a firm’s revenue. Chapter Eight describes pricing methods and strategies that are effective in cyberspace. We take a customer value perspective to illustrate various price-setting strategies (e.g., negotiation, reducing customer risk) and show how these strategies can be used to attain organizational objectives.
    • 9: Post-Modernism and the Web - Societal effects
      This chapter concentrates on societal changes that are encouraged by electronic commerce (and other related trends). Through the metaphors of modernism and postmodernism, we show how electronic commerce influences: perceptions of reality; notions of time and space; values; attitudes toward organizations. Chapter Nine is future oriented and discusses electronic commerce as a revolutionary force that has the potential to transform society and transform consumers’ perceptions of business practice.