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1.3.7.3: Motivating Employees

  • Page ID
    58397
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    Learning Objective

    1. Define motivation and describe several theories of motivation.

    Motivation refers to an internally generated drive to achieve a goal or follow a particular course of action. Highly motivated employees focus their efforts on achieving specific goals; those who are unmotivated don’t. It’s the manager’s job, therefore, to motivate employees—to get them to try to do the best job they can. But what motivates employees to do well? How does a manager encourage employees to show up for work each day and do a good job? Paying them helps, but many other factors influence a person’s desire (or lack of it) to excel in the workplace. What are these factors? Are they the same for everybody? Do they change over time? To address these questions, we’ll examine four of the most influential theories of motivation: hierarchy-of-needs theory, two-factor theory, expectancy theory, and equity theory.


    1.3.7.3: Motivating Employees is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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