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Business LibreTexts

8.2: Why Teamwork Works

  • Page ID
    4024
  • Learning Objectives

    1. Explain why teams may be effective or ineffective.
    2. Identify factors that contribute to team cohesiveness.

    Now that we know a little bit about how teams work, we need to ask ourselves why they work. Not surprisingly, this is a fairly complex issue. In this section, we’ll answer these closely related questions: Why are teams often effective? Why are they sometimes ineffective?

    Factors in Effective Teamwork

    First, let’s begin by identifying several factors that, in practice, tend to contribute to effective teamwork. Generally speaking, teams are effective when the following factors are met (Whetten & Cameron, 2007):

    • Members depend on each other. When team members rely on each other to get the job done, team productivity and efficiency are high.
    • Members trust one another. Teamwork is more effective when members trust each other.
    • Members work better together than individually. When team members perform better as a group than alone, collective performance exceeds individual performance.
    • Members become boosters. When each member is encouraged by other team members to do his or her best, collective results improve.
    • Team members enjoy being on the team. The more that team members derive satisfaction from being on the team, the more committed they become.
    • Leadership rotates. Teams function effectively when leadership responsibility is shared over time.

    Most of these explanations probably make pretty clear intuitive sense. Unfortunately, because such issues are rarely as clear-cut as they may seem at first glance, we need to examine the issue of group effectiveness from another perspective—one that considers the effects of factors that aren’t quite so straightforward.

    Group Cohesiveness

    The idea of group cohesiveness refers to the attractiveness of a team to its members. If a group is high in cohesiveness, membership is quite satisfying to its members; if it’s low in cohesiveness, members are unhappy with it and may even try to leave it. The principle of group cohesiveness, in other words, is based on the simple idea that groups are most effective when their members like being members of the group (George & Jones, 2008; Festinger, 1950).

    What Makes a Team Cohesive?

    Numerous factors may contribute to team cohesiveness, but in this section, we’ll focus on five of the most important:

    1. Size. The bigger the team, the less satisfied members tend to be. When teams get too large, members find it harder to interact closely with other members; a few members tend to dominate team activities, and conflict becomes more likely.
    2. Similarity. People usually get along better with people like themselves, and teams are generally more cohesive when members perceive fellow members as people who share their own attitudes and experience.
    3. Success. When teams are successful, members are satisfied, and other people are more likely to be attracted to their teams.
    4. Exclusiveness. The harder it is to get into a group, the happier the people who are already in it. Status (the extent to which outsiders look up to a team, as well as the perks that come with membership) also increases members’ satisfaction.
    5. Competition. Members value membership more highly when they’re motivated to achieve common goals—especially when those goals mean outperforming other teams.

    Figure 8.2

    8.2.0.jpg

    A cohesive team with goals that are aligned with the goals of the organization is most likely to succeed.

    Teamwork and team spirit – CC BY-ND 2.0.

    There’s such a thing as too much cohesiveness. When, for instance, members are highly motivated to collaborate in performing the team’s activities, the team is more likely to be effective in achieving its goals. Clearly, when those goals are aligned with the goals of the larger organization, the organization, too, will be happy. If, however, its members get too wrapped up in more immediate team goals, the whole team may lose sight of the larger organizational goals toward which it’s supposed to be working.

    Groupthink

    Likewise, it’s easier for leaders to direct members toward team goals when members are all on the same page—when there’s a basic willingness to conform to the team’s rules and guidelines. When there’s too much conformity, however, the group can become ineffective: It may resist change and fresh ideas and, what’s worse, may end up adopting its own dysfunctional tendencies as its way of doing things. Such tendencies may also encourage a phenomenon known as groupthink—the tendency to conform to group pressure in making decisions, while failing to think critically or to consider outside influences.

    Groupthink is often cited as a factor in the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger in January 1986: Engineers from a supplier of components for the rocket booster warned that the launch might be risky because of the weather but were persuaded to reverse their recommendation by NASA officials who wanted the launch to proceed as scheduled (Griffin, 2011).