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3.15.3: Types of Information Systems

  • Page ID
    58899
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    Learning Objective

    1. Discuss ways in which an IS can be designed to meet the needs of individuals at various organizational levels.

    As we saw earlier, different managers, operational units, and functional areas have different information needs. That’s why organizations often tailor information systems to meet particular needs. Caesars’s IT group, for example, developed the Player Contact System (Dunn, 2003; Dunn, 2003). to help its casino salespeople connect to top customers on a more personal basis. Working from a prioritized list of customer names displayed on a computer screen, the salesperson clicks on a name to view relevant information about the customer, such as background and preferred casino activities. There’s even a printed script that can be used to guide the conversation. Such a system isn’t very helpful, however, to middle or top-level managers, who need systems to help them carry out their oversight and planning responsibilities. To design marketing programs, for instance, marketing managers rely on summary information gleaned from a dedicated customer-relationship management system. Let’s look at some of the widely available information systems designed to support people at the operational and upper-management levels.


    3.15.3: Types of Information Systems is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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