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10.6: Due Process in the Juvenile Court

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    43670
    • pexels-photo-923681.jpg
    • Contributed by Alison S. Burke, David Carter, Brian Fedorek, Tiffany Morey, Lore Rutz-Burri, & Shanell Sanchez
    • Professors (Criminology and Criminal Justice) at Southern Oregon University
    • Sourced from OpenOregon

    Kent v. United States (1966) [1]

    parens patriae philosophy of the Juvenile Court ‘is not an invitation to procedural arbitrariness.'” [2]

    In re Gault (1967). [3]

    In re Winship (1970) [4]

    Breed v. Jones (1975) [5]

    [6]


    1. Kent v. United States, 383 U.S. 541, 86 S.Ct. 1045 (1966).
    2. Kent v. United States, 383 U.S. 541, 86 S.Ct. 1045, pp. 554-556 (1966)
    3. In re Gault, 387 U.S. 1, 87 S.Ct. 1428 (1967)
    4. In re Winship, 397 U.S. 358, 90 S.Ct. 1068 (1970)
    5. Breed v. Jones, 421 U.S. 519, 95 S.Ct. 1779 (1975)
    6. 27 Raley, Gordon. 1995. "The JJDP Act: A Second Look." Juvenile Justice Journal, 2:11–18.