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1.12: Street Crime, Corporate Crime, and White-Collar Crime

  • Page ID
    43573
    • pexels-photo-923681.jpg
    • Contributed by Alison S. Burke, David Carter, Brian Fedorek, Tiffany Morey, Lore Rutz-Burri, & Shanell Sanchez
    • Professors (Criminology and Criminal Justice) at Southern Oregon University
    • Sourced from OpenOregon

    Street Crime

    [1]

    [2]

    https://news.gallup.com/poll/178856/...ans-worry.aspx. For most people in society, people can go about their daily lives without the fear of being a victim of street crime. Street crime is important to take seriously, but it is reassuring to note that it is unlikely to happen to most people. The conversation should happen around why fears are high, especially amongst those less likely to be a victim. For example, elderly citizens have the greatest fear of street crime, yet they are the group least likely to experience it. Whereas younger people, especially young men, are less likely to fear crime and are the most likely to experience it. [3]

    Gallup polls

    [4] The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) estimated in 2015 that financial loses from property crime at $14.3 billion in 2014 (FBI, 2015a), but keep that number in mind for a minute. [5] Although it is crucial to recognize that street crime does occur, and it impacts certain groups disproportionately more than others, it is also important to recognize other types of crime less commonly talked discussed. In fact, the BJS does not have a link that directs people to the next two types of crime discussed when on their main page of crime type.

    Corporate Crime

    [6] Corporate crime is an offense committed by a corporation’s officers who pursue illegal activity (various kinds) in the name of the corporation. The goal is to make money for the business and run a profitable business, and the representatives of the business. Corporate crime may also include environmental crime if a corporation damages the environment to earn a profit. [7] As C. Wright Mills (1952) once stated, “corporate crime creates higher immorality” in U.S. society. [8] Corporate crime inflicts far more damage on society than all street crime combined, by death, injury, or dollars lost.

    [9]

    [10]

    [11] Compare 54,000 Americans who die every year on the job or from occupational diseases such as black lung and asbestosis and the additional tens of thousands of other Americans who fall victim every year to the silent violence of pollution, contaminated foods, hazardous consumer products, and hospital malpractice. [12] A vast majority of these deaths are often the result of criminal recklessness. Americans are rarely made aware of them, and they rarely make their way through the criminal justice system.

    [13] https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/fatal-ford-pinto-crash-in-indiana.

    [14]

    White-Collar Crime

    [15]

    Dr. Sanchez’s Professor in Graduate School

    [16]


    1. https://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=316
    2. Morgan, R., & Truman, J., (December, 2018). NCJ 252472
    3. Doerner, W. G., & Lab, S.P. (2008). Victimology (5th ed.). Cincinnati, Ohio: Lexis-Nexis.
    4. Kyckelhahn, T. (2012). Justice expenditure and employment extracts. Bureau of Justice Statistics
    5. FBI. (2015b), September 28). Latest crime stats released. Washington, DC: US Department of Justice.
    6. Fuller, J.R. (2019). Introduction to criminal justice. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    7. Fuller, J.R. (2019). Introduction to criminal justice. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    8. Horowitz, I. (Ed.) (2008), Power, politics, and people. Wright Mills, C. (1952). A diagnosis of moral uneasiness (pp.330-339). New York: Ballantine.
    9. (2000). License To Steal: How Fraud Bleeds America's Health Care System. Westview Press.
    10. Folger, J. (November, 2011). The Enron collapse: A look back. Investopedia. Retrieved from https://www.investopedia.com/updates/enron-scandal-summary/
    11. FBI: UCR. 2016. FBI Murder. ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/topic-pages/murder
    12. Mokhiber, R. Corporate crime & violence: Big business power and the abuse of the public trust. Random House, Inc.
    13. Steinzor, R. (Dec. 2014). It’s called 'Why Not Jail?': Industrial catastrophes, corporate malfeasance, and government inaction. Cambridge University Press.
    14. Kleck, G. (1982). On the use of self-report data to determine the class distribution of criminal and delinquent behavior." American Sociological Review, 427-433.
    15. Zarroli, J. (2018). For Madoff victims, scars remain 10 years later, National Public Radio, https://www.npr.org/2018/12/23/678238031/for-madoff-victims-scars-remain-10-years-later
    16. Fuller, J.R. (2019). Introduction to Criminal Justice. New York: Oxford, Oxford University Press.