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Business LibreTexts

12: Organization and Outlines

  • Page ID
    12461
    • 12.1: Rhetorical Situation
      In the classical tradition, the art of public speaking is called rhetoric; the circumstances in which you give your speech or presentation are the rhetorical situation. By understanding the rhetorical situation, you can gauge the best ways to reach your listeners and get your points across. The rhetorical situation has three components: the context, the audience, and the purpose of the speech.
    • 12.2: Strategies for Success
      Given the diverse nature of audiences, the complexity of the communication process, and the countless options and choices to make when preparing your speech, you may feel overwhelmed. One effective way to address this is to focus on ways to reach, interact, or stimulate your audience. Humans share many of the same basic needs, and meeting those needs provides various strategies for action.
    • 12.3: Building a Sample Speech
      Speeches are built by identifying the main points to be communicated and by following five structural elements (attention statement, introduction, body, conclusion, and residual message).
    • 12.4: Sample Speech Outlines
      An outline is a framework that helps the speaker to organize ideas and tie them to the main structural elements of the speech.
    • 12.5: Organizing Principles for Your Speech
      A speech may be organized according to any of many different organizing principles. There are many different ways to organize a speech, and none is “better” or “more correct” than the others. The choice of an organizing principle, or a core assumption around which everything else is arranged, depends on the subject matter, the rhetorical situation, and many other factors, including your preference as speaker.
    • 12.6: Transitions
      A speech needs transitions to help the audience understand how the speaker’s main ideas are connected to one another.
    • 12.7: Additional Resources